Monday, January 26, 2009

New Blog Address

I totally forgot to put this here. I've moved my blog to a new address and will be updating there from now on. So just in case you're still linking to this blog...move along...there's nothing more to see.

Go here now: http://canjimdraw.blogspot.com/

Wednesday, December 24, 2008

Whoah-oh, here they come...

I caught Hall and Oates making an appearance on Jon Stewart a week or so back. Man, they're getting old.


Special bonus is this characature I did of Anne Hathaway after seeing her on The Daily Show as well. I have to say, she seems a pretty well adjusted, down-to-earth kind of chick.

Merry Holidays!


Tuesday, December 16, 2008

grunk.


Wednesday, December 03, 2008

More still...


Tuesday, December 02, 2008

The Times, they are a Metro


Here's another cover for the local Detroit alternative paper, the Metro Times. The story centers around Chaldean refugees from Iraq making a new home in the Motor City. Pick it up tomorrow at a newsstand near you!



Thursday, November 20, 2008

See? More Ellie.

Tuesday, November 18, 2008

Sketchtronic!

A few drawings from my tablet pc:








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Ellie Evolution


My one ever evolving project is Ellie on Planet X - kind of an internet comic/children's book thingy in the works. It's been an epic in the making, with its natal beginnings over ten years ago, still waiting to see the light of day. Ellie's character didn't even show up in the story until late in the brain storming process and has gone through many changes along the way. Partly because my style over the years has improved, but also because I can't make a decision on how I just want to do the art for the story. But the idea behind refining her character design has always been to simplify Ellie and come up with a formula to draw her the same every time.

Originally Ellie was going to be a little girl in a space suit, but for the practicality of the plot line it made more sense to make her a robot girl instead. The above drawing was the very first sketch I did of her. She already had antenna on her head to represent pony tails and a solar panel skirt. I went from drawing to 3D models, back to drawing, then to vector illustrations for simplicity (which only made it more complicated), then back to drawing, all the while trying to make her design more and more simple.










I found that having a permanent smile made it difficult to show different emotions on her face - having to cover it up with an arm or a shadow - so I dropped it. And I continued the simplification process by limiting the colors too.





I'll spend hours drawing Ellie over and over again just to work out problems I have with posing her or the kind of emotions I'm trying to portray.

And just when I thought I had it figured out I started at it again. I don't know if I like where it's going, but I thought I'd simplify her head some more and make it easier and quicker to draw. If ever the story makes it to the light of day I guess I'll have to choose.


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Wednesday, October 29, 2008

Boooooooo!

That's "Booooooooo!" as in "Sit down! Get outta here!" Not "Booooooooo!" as in "Scared ya, didn't I?"

Last night was a special Halloween Dr. Sketchy. Our models were Christopher from Causing a Scene, along with a woman who was not his grandmother (she was slated to appear but bowed out do to a cold). The two donned some elaborate costumes and spilled some blood to bring us a rollicking good sketch-fest. The dj kicked butt too.

I brought along my mini watercolor set to try out and picked up a Moleskine pad to paint in, but I gotta tell ya, I just wasn't feeling it. The secret to any success that I have in putting out a decent Dr. Sketchy sketch is time and the ability to work and re-work and fix and fudge whatever drawing I'm working on. I'm just not really proficient in drawing an anatomically correct figure by staring at the model and putting what I see down on paper. My thirty second and one minute quick sketches hardly represent what I see going on before me and I greatly admire (and envy) those people who can do it. I dream of being able to draw just a few quick lines that capture the movement and proportions of the model. And if I could do it with a brush pen where the results mimic the look of Japanese ink brush drawings, the better. I just don't know how. I had the minimal amount of figure illustration classes in college, and that was twenty years ago. In all that intervening time I've never pursued that information. Well, I guess it's time to do something about that. Especially after the crap I produced last night.

Now, in retrospect, my drawings aren't all that horrible. There are some good things going on in some of them. The colors are nice. But as a whole, I failed miserably due to the unforgiving nature of rushing to get ink onto the paper and coloring it in. The figure is the most important aspect of the drawing. Even if it's a cartoon. And it would help if I really knew how to use an ink brush properly too. So I'll try it again next time but I'll have to do some homework beforehand.







Monday, October 27, 2008

Real painting with real paint!

It doesn't happen much, but very rarely I put down my electronical painting devices and pull out real live paints and brushes and make something original that can actually hang on a wall. Sure, the anatomy is all wrong but who cares? Well, I do but...whatever. Anyway, here ya go:


Thursday, October 16, 2008

Various Offerings from the Sketchbook





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Wednesday, October 01, 2008

Zoo Review Redux

Another trip to the zoo, another chance to try my luck at capturing animal likenesses with my watercolors and brush pen.










Tuesday, September 30, 2008

War is graphic

Here's another Metro Times illustration, this time for a review for Spike Lee's latest, Miracle at St. Anna. You can read the review here, or pick up a copy tomorrow at a newsstand near you.

Tuesday, September 23, 2008

The subtlety of yellow.

Another illustration for the telephone sales presentation I'm working on.


I'm posting this just after I finished reading a blog article by animation industry designer Hans Bacher. Animation art has been a big influence on me and background art is a somewhat overlooked component. In this article Bacher talks about the subtlety of traditional Disney animation backgrounds - specifically the use of the color green in Bambi - in comparison to how brightly backgrounds are painted today. Nothing subtle about my use of color as I somehow feel the need to hit the viewer over the head with it. Perhaps a closer study is required.

Funily (??!) enough, Bacher also states that "artists from southern, lighter and sunnier countries use more colorful color combinations than the ones from northern, cooler countries." Maybe I just haven't realized that I live in Michigan yet.